Fri, Nov 10 8:00PM
The Music Room

PATRICK SWEANY

ROD HAMDALLAH / TRUETT

$10 IN ADVANCE / $15 DAY OF / $75 VIP TICKETS


Artist Bios

PATRICK SWEANY

Patrick Sweany likes the spaces in between. On a given night (or on a given album) he'll swing through blues, folk, soul, bluegrass, maybe some classic 50s rock, or a punk speedball. He's a musical omnivore, devouring every popular music sound of the last 70 years, and mixing 'em all together seamlessly into his own stew. Yet, the one thing that most people notice about Patrick isn't his ability to copy - it's his authenticity. Like his heroes, artists like Bobby "Blue" Bland, Doug Sahm, Joe Tex, Patrick somehow manages to blend all of these influences into something all his own. It's no wonder that as a kid he immersed himself in his dad's extensive record collection: 60s folk, vintage country, soul, and, of course, blues. Patrick spent hours teaching himself to fingerpick along to Leadbelly, Lightnin' Hopkins, and other folk-blues giants. In his late teens, Patrick began playing the clubs and coffeehouses around Kent, OH. He quickly gained a reputation for the intricate country blues style he was developing: part Piedmont picking, part Delta slide - with an equally impressive deep, smooth vocal style. But Patrick wouldn't stay in the acoustic world for long. His love of 50s era soul and rock fused with the adrenaline-soaked garage punk revival happening throughout the Rust Belt pushed Pat to form a band. After 4 critically acclaimed CDs (two produced by longtime collaborator Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys), Patrick has expanded his touring radius to 49 states and the UK. He's played premiere festivals all over the U.S., and supported national acts such as The Black Keys, The Gourds, The Wood Brothers, Wayne Hancock, Hot Tuna, and Paul Thorn on tour. His latest record, Close To The Floor, hit the streets July 16, 2013. It was recorded to 2" tape in Nasheville, TN and features contributions from Joe McMahan (Luella & The Sun, Allsion Moorer, Webb Wilder), Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Levon Helm), Jon Radford (Justin Townes Earle, Lilly Hiatt), and Ryan Norris (Lambchop), among others. Close To The Floor is a gritty, hard look at some very difficult recent events in Sweany's life and recalls the halcyon days of Muscle Shoals releases by Dan Penn, Eddie Hinton and Leon Russell.


ROD HAMDALLAH

Hailing from Atlanta, GA, Garage Rocker, Rod Hamdallah has been tearing up the southeast's vibrant music scene since before he was old enough to order his first drink. At 16, Rod began soaking up the Southern Delta Blues and Garage Rock sounds at a relentless pace; Influenced by early Soul, Blues and Garage Rock, Rod took his sound to another level. At 17, he started sharing the stage with influences such as, Sean Costello, Dexter Romweber and more.

Rod's original musical elements are rooted in Blues, Garage and Early Soul. Low-fidelity, dark storytelling and American Roots Music play a big part in the song writing. He creates a sound that can be likened to artists such as, The Flat Duo Jets, Captain Beefheart and more current acts such as The Black Lips and The Growlers.
Debut EP ‘Think About It’ comes out May 1st. Garage Rock and Lo-fi Bluesy vocals throughout all 5 tracks. The single "Think About It" keeps your head shaking with dirty guitar and a punk attitude, while the soulful vocals keep their place. "Carry You Home" featuring Colonel J.D. Wilkes of Th' Legendary Shack Shakers adds banjo and dreamy Wurlitzer piano to the Bluesy western tune. You can hear hints of The Black Keys and Jack White.
Crafting a sound from all influences and personal experience with dynamic variation and melodic vocals.


TRUETT

People often talk about musicians needing to “pay their dues” before they deserve success. Truett has paid his many times over; enough to treat himself and ten friends to an all expenses paid trip straight to the top. Sweating it out night after night in blues bars around the South, screaming into the bright lights and cigarette smoke like the ghost of Howlin’ Wolf, soloing until his hands bled hour after hour, roadhouse after roadhouse, mile after mile.

“I never really liked that many rock bands, so I’m coming at this from a different place than most people. I think that’s why my music doesn’t sound just like anything else,” Truett said.

Is Truett a soul singer? He was raised on Bill Withers and Stevie Wonder and can croon a Sam Cooke song or shout his lungs out a la Jackie Wilson. Is Truett a guitar virtuoso? Hearing him play is like having Albert Collins throw his drink in your face and kick his muddy boot up on your table to solo at the height of his powers. Is what Truett does easy to define? Absolutely not. He’ll take you from the Mississippi Delta to Prince’s Minneapolis, Chicago blues to Bowery Punk, down through Outkast’s Atlanta and out the other side of the psychedelic rabbit hole. That explosive mix makes for a singular experience.

Years ago, when he was still just a boy, Truett was briefly kidnapped by Ron Pope and his band, The District. A child prodigy on guitar, Truett traveled around Georgia sitting in with the band (who had strict instructions from Truett’s mother to make sure he didn’t “drink, smoke, take drugs, or have sex”). That journey marked the beginning of a brotherhood that is finally bearing fruit with “Be Mine,” Truett’s debut single on Brooklyn Basement Records (co-written and produced by Pope). The song features Godzilla-sized guitar tone pummeling a larger than life riff, powered by an angular, sticky groove punctuated by Truett’s hell hound on my trail moan and mind bending guitar pyrotechnics.

Truett is more than the sum of his influences; what he does is unique and spectacular. His work is evocative of many things, but a carbon copy of nothing that came before. He’s classic and modern, new and old, absolutely stunning in his raw, unbridled authenticity.