Fri, May 18 8:00PM
The Music Room

MIGRANT WORKER / CODY MARLOWE

Sunny South Blues Band

$10 IN ADVANCE / $12 DAY OF / $60 VIP TABLES


Artist Bios

MIGRANT WORKER

"The folk singers job is to comfort the disturbed, and to disturb the comfortable."

Woody Guthrie said these words many years ago, yet they still resonate today just as much as ever. Migrant Worker makes music that hopefully gives justice to the above statement.

Since forming in early 2012, Migrant Worker has brought their mixture of American Roots Music to the greater Atlanta area. Blurring the lines between Country, Folk and Rock, Migrant Worker seeks to bring back the urgency and realness that was once so ever present in the musical landscape.

On any given night the band can be seen bringing their original music to the masses while still paying homage to anyone from Gram Parsons to Woody Guthrie, Ry Cooder to Ryan Adams, Led Zeppelin to Lead Belly, and anything in between. Migrant Worker is a band which pays tribute to the past while looking forward.


CODY MARLOWE

Georgia born singer-songwriter and roots-rock artist Cody Marlowe found his inspiration at an early age in the soulful sounds of B.B. King, Merle Haggard, and the Allman Brothers. Marlowe’s songs explore the polarities of good and evil in an intriguing blend of lyrics featuring lost loves and hopeful musings.

His most recent album, “Silver and Gold,” is his third release since his first EP, “Where You Are,” released in 2010 and his first full length, “Eighty Nine,” released later that same year. For the new album, Marlowe teamed up with brothers, producer/drummer Kevin Sellors and bass player Ryan Sellors, to form his new back-up band the Dead Flowers. During the recording process, Marlowe recruited Joey Huffman on organ (Hank Jr., Matchbox 20) and Nathan Bedingfield on electric guitar (Aaron Shust).

“Silver and Gold” is a return to the roots of rock n roll, country, blues, and honest songwriting; reminiscent of Tom Petty and the Black Crowes but with a modern edge inspired by childhood in the 90’s. Expect this album to earn respect from the musicians of the past while stretching the musical paradigm of a younger generation.


SUNNY SOUTH BLUES BAND

The idea behind SSBB began with a family band that goes back to the early 1900s with the Sunny South Orchestra, a brass band that played with army issued instruments. The project went dormant for the remainder of the 20th century until the brothers McIntire, Ross and Cliff, began playing with friends around Clermont, GA including the monstrous drummer Matt Hulsey, a close cousin of the McIntire brothers. The group bonded early over their mutual love of the blues revival of the 1960s thus giving the band the “Blues Band” moniker at the end of the Sunny South family band name. The final lineup came together with the addition of Aaron “Beans” Metzdorf in 2014. With the indubitable family ties and Metzdorf’s Southern soul and surf rock sensibilities, SSBB became what we know them as today, a thunderous adaptation of blues-based garage rock with a tinge of 60’s popular music.

With a myriad of influences and a portfolio of fresh, original music SSBB made for Nashville, TN and famed Bomb Shelter Studios to record their debut album. With guidance from Bootin’ Billy Bennett (The Whigs, MGMT), the resulting 9 song LP is a Velcro-fuzzed, reverb-soaked rock n’ roll exploratory expedition. With songs ranging from riff-rock perfection in album opener DBL to the Muscle Shoals-inspired Something ‘bout a Woman, to their soaring cover of the 1975 Bob Dylan deep cut Meet Me in the Morning, SSBB has crafted a debut that is both introspective in its subject matter and unyielding in its execution.

SSBB began by delivering electric live shows to its small, yet devoted fan base and has, to date, yet to let off the gas. With an array of crowd-pleasing rock n’ roll that satisfies even the harshest of music fans, SSBB serves heaping helpings of dirty guitars, mumble-sang vocals, and a rhythm section that rivals even the finest Swiss watchmakers. SSBB is playing music that harkens back to the days of old, when music meant something other than a paycheck or self-righteous self pity, days when musicians were forging the names that we still speak of today and much like these unforgettable effigies SSBB is here to stay.